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Subj:....The History Of Crossword Puzzles
         From: LABLaughsClean on 5/12/2008 (S591b)
Picture from Markiss.com.uk...

The crossword puzzle began in 1913, when Arthur Wynne was trying to think up new word games for the entertainment page of the Christmas edition of New York World magazine.  It was a variation on a game called "word squares" his grandfather had taught him, where each word in the puzzle had to read the same both vertically and horizontally. 
Wynne originally called the game "Word-Cross" but a month later typesetters accidentally reversed the words in the title and the new version stuck.

The puzzles were popular, but magazine and newspaper editors hated them. They were difficult to print and easy to make errors in the fine-print clue section, so for the next ten years, if you wanted to work a crossword puzzle, you had to buy New York World. Then, in 1924, a young Columbia University graduate named Richard Simon had dinner at his aunt's house and his aunt asked him where she could buy a book of crossword puzzles for her daughter.

The answer was that she couldn't. No book existed. Simon, however, at that time was trying to break into the publishing business with college chum M. Lincoln Shuster.  They went to the offices of New York World magazine and paid them $25 apiece for their most popular crossword 
puzzles, then spent the rest of their money publishing them in book form.

By the end of the year more than 300,000 copies had been sold, and Simon & Shuster had become a major publishing company. Today they are the largest publishing house in the United States and second largest in the world.  All because of the humble crossword puzzle.

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Below, you can see (and try your hand at) the world's very first
crossword puzzle, designed by Arthur Wynne.  It appeared in the
New York World on December 21, 1913.  It's source is
http://www.neatorama.com:80/2008/03/31/worlds-first-crossword-puzzle/
 
 
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2-3.
4-5.
6-7.
10-11.
14-15.
18-19.
22-23.
26-27.
28-29.
30-31.
8-9.
12-13.
16-17.
20-21.
24-25.
10-18.
What bargain hunters enjoy.
A written acknowledgment.
Such and nothing more.
A bird.
Opposed to less.
What this puzzle is.
An animal of prey.
The close of a day.
To elude.
The plural of is.
To cultivate.
A bar of wood or iron.
What artists learn to do.
Fastened.
Found on the seashore.
The fiber of the gomuti palm.
6-22.
4-26.
2-11.
19-28.
F-7.
23.30.
1-32.
33-34.
N-8.
24-31.
3-12.
20-29.
5-27.
9- 25.
13-21.
What we all should be.
A day dream.
A talon.
A pigeon.
Part of your head.
A river in Russia.
To govern.
An aromatic plant.
A fist.
To agree with.
Part of a ship.
One.
Exchanging.
To sink in mud.
A boy. 
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